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BENEFITS OF DRUMMING

​Drumming and its effect have been studied extensively by scientists for over a few decades.  The evidence is clear: drumming offers tremendous benefits to our physical, mental and emotional health. Here are some articles and videos to support and inspire you. 

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Neuroscience reveals how rhythm helps us walk, talk — and even love

Rhythm goes far deeper than just music — it underpins the way we speak, the way we move, the way we think. 'Rhythm is life,' says Lois Butcher Poffley, a sports psychologist with a speciality in rhythm training.

Drumming up a happier workplace

Drumming sessions at work could help employees defend themselves from stress and lower staff turnover. 

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Corporate employee wellness impact: 

Recreational music-making strengthens the immune system and improves mood states of corporate employees. 

Effectiveness for employee burnout and turn over reduction

Recreational music-making: A cost-effective group interdisciplinary strategy for reducing burnout and improving mood states in long-term care workers. 

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10 Health Reasons to Start Drumming

Drumming can have positive effects on your health and may help with many conditions from anxiety, to hypertension, chronic pain, addiction, and even cancer.  Here’s why drumming is good for you. 

What Happens in the Brain When People Make Music Together?

Music is a tool that has accompanied our evolutionary journey and provided a sense of comfort and social connection for millennia. New research provides a neuroscientific understanding of the social connection with a new map of the brain when playing music.

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Your brain on improv

Musician and researcher Charles Limb wondered how the brain works during musical improvisation -- so he put jazz musicians and rappers in an fMRI to find out. What he and his team found has deep implications for our understanding of creativity of all kinds.

How playing an instrument benefits your brain

Did you know that every time when musicians pick up their instruments, there are fireworks going off all over their brains? 

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Effects of group drumming interventions on anxiety, depression, social resilience and inflammatory immune response

A study by the Royal College of Music in London has found that group drumming reduces depression by 38% and anxiety by 20%.

The neurochemistry and social flow of singing: bonding and oxytocin

People often report a feeling of connectedness during music experiences, either as a listener or a performer. 

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Drum Circle Consciousness
by Arthur Hull

Drum circle consciousness is a group vision manifest in sound, an attitude of giving of yourself and integrating yourself into a group to create a song. You become a part of a whole that is more than the sum of its parts.

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Should Drums Be Sold In Pharmacies?    By Christine Stevens

A product that has been shown to contribute to a healthy lifestyle and even boost the immune system is missing from modern-day drugstores. That product is the drum.

Oliver Sacks Observes the Mind Through Music

Physician and author Oliver Sacks has spent 40 years studying the human brain and his newest collection of clinical tales,  Musicophilia, examines the uniquely human power of music.

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Playing an instrument, singing can help the brain defend against dementia

A new study finds participating in music making can help the brain ward off the effects of cognitive decline.

Music education key to raising literacy and numeracy standards

Instead of agonising over why students can't or won't study maths or science perhaps we should concentrate on improving cognitive capacity via music lessons.

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Keeping the beat: It's all in your brain

How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear?

The Impact of Group Drumming on Social-Emotional Behavior in Low-Income Children

The weekly intervention integrated rhythmic and group counseling activities to build skills, such as emotion management, focus and listening. 

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